What to Do if a Defective or Unsafe Vehicle Caused the Accident?

An accident can be caused by a defective or unsafe vehicle even though both drivers involved in the accident were obeying traffic laws. Some of the most common car issues that can cause accidents include fuel system defects, defective tires, acceleration problems or engine fires. In order to receive help in assigning liability to a manufacturer or distributor, you should hire a personal injury lawyer as soon as possible.

If you were involved in a traffic accident despite the fact that both you and the other driver were following all traffic regulations, there is a good chance one of the vehicles was defective or unsafe. The high number of automobiles being recalled each year reveals that design or manufacture defects are not rare. Some of the most common manufacturing defects that are likely to result in traffic accidents include:

  • Unintended acceleration
  • Engine fires
  • Fuel system issues
  • Defective tires

Even if no manufacturing defect caused the accident, an unsafe vehicle could still worsen the consequences of a crash. Improperly functioning safety equipment, like seatbelts or airbags that fail to deploy, expose driver and passengers to serious injury risks like head or spinal cord injuries.

If you were involved in a crash due to a defective or unsafe vehicle, we might be able to help you recover damages. Several entities might be held responsible for your losses, including:

  • The designer of the vehicle
  • The manufacturing company
  • The manufacturer of different parts of the car
  • The company that assembled the vehicle
  • The distributor of the vehicle

Is A 5-STAR Rating Car Safe?

The New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) created the Safety Ratings to provide information about the crash protection and rollover safety. A five-star rating only means increased safety on a relative scale. It means 10% or less chance of severe injuries, but you can still receive serious injuries.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) created the 5-Star Safety Ratings Program in 1978 to provide consumers with information about the crash protection and rollover safety of new vehicles beyond what is required by Federal law. Having a 5-star rating only means you are safer on a relative scale. A standard of guidelines to measure the effectiveness of safety systems has been set up. Here are the details of what these stars actually mean:

  • 1 Star = 46% or greater chance of severe injuries
  • 2 Stars = 36%-45% chance of severe injuries
  • 3 Stars = 21%-36% chance of severe injuries
  • 4 Stars = 11%-20% chance of severe injuries
  • 5 Stars = 10% or even less chance of severe injuries

5-Star Safety Ratings can be found on SaferCar.gov and are posted on the Monroney labels (window stickers) that are required to be displayed on all new vehicles.

Even with a 5-star rating, your car needs proper maintenance, and there is also the risk of an accident caused by a defective airbag. If you suffered a defective airbag-related accident, you can sue the manufacturer, and for that, you need the help of a Miami based experienced lawyer to guide you and assist you through the legal process.

We work together with automobile construction engineers and accident reconstruction specialists to establish the exact cause of your crash and to identify responsible parties. Once in possession of consistent evidence, we negotiate a fair settlement on your behalf, including compensation for economic and non-economic, loses, like medical bills, lost wages, property damage and pain and suffering. If however negotiations fail, we will take your case to court by suing large manufacturing companies. We believe you should not settle for anything less than you deserve and need to move on with your life. Call our Miami based office today.

For questions and free legal advice to help individuals please call us

305.416.9805
Disclaimer: Please note that the information provided on this site is not formal legal advice, also the site does not allow you to form an attorney-client relationship.